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Abstract

The syntax of postpositions in Korean is unique and worth analyzing for the purpose of teaching English to Korean speakers. Korean uses a variety of postpositions that affect the meaning and the structure of sentences. Postpositions function like prepositions in English in that they assign case to nouns. However, Korean postpositions are different from prepositions in English in that they call for a variety of word order changes. In this study, we examine how the use of postpositions results in word order variations in Korean and discuss its pedagogical implications in ESL settings.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Faculty Supervisor

Ettien Koffi

Author Bio

Minhui Choi is a graduate student in the MA TESL/Applied Linguistics program. She has spent most her life in South Korea. She earned a BA degree from the Chonbuk National University in South Korea in English Education and Social Studies Education. She has taught English as a Foreign Language for eight years in South Korea. She can be reached at: choimn2157@gmail.com

Emily Schmit is a graduate student in the MA Writing and Rhetoric program. She has spent most her life in Minnesota. She earned a BA degree from the College of Saint Benedict in English and Secondary Education. She has been teaching English Language Arts for three years and her area of interest is writing pedagogy and writing center theory. She can be reached at: schmitemily12@gmail.com

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