Event Title

Evolution of Body Shape in the Deep-Sea Hatchetfishes (Sternoptychidae)

Presentation Type

Powerpoint Presentation

Start Date

23-4-2019 12:00 AM

End Date

23-4-2019 12:00 AM

Description

Award for Best Graduate Oral Presentation.

Abstract

Stomiiformes (dragonfishes and their allies) are a species-rich order of fishes (~440 species) that are primarily found throughout the meso-bathypelagic zone of the world's oceans. The bodies of Stomiiformes are covered in an array of bioluminescent photophores that produce light in their near dark-to-dark environment. In contrast to the more elongated body plan of most stomiiform fishes, the family Sternoptychidae (hatchetfishes, ~78 species) has evolved a hatchet-like body shape. Few studies have investigated the evolution of body shape among stomiiform fishes, a lineage that has evolved exclusively in a pelagic deep-sea environment. In this study we use landmark-based geometric morphometrics to examine the differences in body morphology across the family Sternoptychidae. We also explore the evolution of body shape among hatchetfishes in the context of their evolutionary relationships inferred from a synthesis of genome-scale sequencing with ultraconserved elements and protein-coding gene fragments.

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Apr 23rd, 12:00 AM Apr 23rd, 12:00 AM

Evolution of Body Shape in the Deep-Sea Hatchetfishes (Sternoptychidae)

Award for Best Graduate Oral Presentation.

Abstract

Stomiiformes (dragonfishes and their allies) are a species-rich order of fishes (~440 species) that are primarily found throughout the meso-bathypelagic zone of the world's oceans. The bodies of Stomiiformes are covered in an array of bioluminescent photophores that produce light in their near dark-to-dark environment. In contrast to the more elongated body plan of most stomiiform fishes, the family Sternoptychidae (hatchetfishes, ~78 species) has evolved a hatchet-like body shape. Few studies have investigated the evolution of body shape among stomiiform fishes, a lineage that has evolved exclusively in a pelagic deep-sea environment. In this study we use landmark-based geometric morphometrics to examine the differences in body morphology across the family Sternoptychidae. We also explore the evolution of body shape among hatchetfishes in the context of their evolutionary relationships inferred from a synthesis of genome-scale sequencing with ultraconserved elements and protein-coding gene fragments.