Event Title

Evolution of Body Shape in the Deep-Sea Hatchetfishes (Sternoptychidae)

Presentation Type

Powerpoint Presentation

Start Date

23-4-2019 12:00 AM

End Date

23-4-2019 12:00 AM

Description

Award for Runner-Up Graduate Oral Presentation.

Abstract

Salmonella is a pathogenic bacterium that is commonly known to infect humans and animals, resulting in approximately 19,000 hospitalizations and 380 deaths yearly. Recent studies have discovered eating contaminated fruits and vegetables to be a major source of Salmonella outbreaks. These studies have shown that some serovars of Salmonella are not only found on the surface of the fruits and vegetables, but are actually found living within the fruits, leaves, and roots of the plants. This is cause for major concern as surface sterilization of the edible products would not be enough to prevent an outbreak. There are two species and six sub-species of Salmonella. These Salmonella subspecies are very similar genetically and produce many similar virulence factors and secretion proteins. These virulence factors and secretion proteins are predicted to be what enables Salmonella to enter, grow, and survive within their plant host. Comparing the location, growth and survival of the Salmonella sub-species (Bongori, Enterica, Arizonae, Diarizonae, Salamae, Indica, and Houtenae) within a model organism (Arabidopsis thaliana) will provide a further understanding of how plants may act as a host organism to the Salmonella species. This along with a genomic comparison of the secretion proteins from all Salmonella sub-species could help to identify what genes are necessary for the survival of Salmonella within a plant host. With this information we could reduce the number of plant related Salmonella outbreaks.

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Apr 23rd, 12:00 AM Apr 23rd, 12:00 AM

Evolution of Body Shape in the Deep-Sea Hatchetfishes (Sternoptychidae)

Award for Runner-Up Graduate Oral Presentation.

Abstract

Salmonella is a pathogenic bacterium that is commonly known to infect humans and animals, resulting in approximately 19,000 hospitalizations and 380 deaths yearly. Recent studies have discovered eating contaminated fruits and vegetables to be a major source of Salmonella outbreaks. These studies have shown that some serovars of Salmonella are not only found on the surface of the fruits and vegetables, but are actually found living within the fruits, leaves, and roots of the plants. This is cause for major concern as surface sterilization of the edible products would not be enough to prevent an outbreak. There are two species and six sub-species of Salmonella. These Salmonella subspecies are very similar genetically and produce many similar virulence factors and secretion proteins. These virulence factors and secretion proteins are predicted to be what enables Salmonella to enter, grow, and survive within their plant host. Comparing the location, growth and survival of the Salmonella sub-species (Bongori, Enterica, Arizonae, Diarizonae, Salamae, Indica, and Houtenae) within a model organism (Arabidopsis thaliana) will provide a further understanding of how plants may act as a host organism to the Salmonella species. This along with a genomic comparison of the secretion proteins from all Salmonella sub-species could help to identify what genes are necessary for the survival of Salmonella within a plant host. With this information we could reduce the number of plant related Salmonella outbreaks.