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Title

Edward Jacobsen Oral History

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Document Type

Interview

Publication Date

11-24-1990

Abstract

Biographical information:

Edward Jacobsen was born on July 22, 1922 in Chicago, Illinois. He enrolled in ROTC while at Austin High School in Chicago and at Ripon College in Wisconsin. He served as an infantryman in World War II and participated in the Battle of the Bulge among others. He returned to school after the war, where he attended Ripon College, University of Oklahoma, University of Wisconsin, and University of Chicago. Jacobsen was employed at Winona State University, eventually becoming Director of Libraries and later as Dean of Learning Resources. He retired in 1984 as Dean Emeritus. Jacobsen married his wife Marjorie on December 22, 1943. He died on August 21, 2003.

Transcript Summary:

Edward Jacobsen talked mainly about his experiences during World War II. He described his experience entering the service at Fort McClellan, Alabama for basic infantry training and later for Reserve Officers Training at Fort Benning, Georgia. Jacobsen was later shipped out to Warminster, England in preparation for the D-Day invasion. After D-Day, Jacobsen was assigned to D Company, 320th Infantry, 35th Infantry Division, of the 3rd Army led by George Patton. Jacobsen articulated his thoughts about Patton and British general Bernard Montgomery as commanders, as well as some of the weapons he used in combat. Jacobsen fought during the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944 around Bastogne and the “Rose Pocket” in the Ruhr. Jacobsen talked about his experiences with casualties, German POWs, and fighting a SS division at the Battle of the Bulge. He also discussed unit reunions that were held some years later, traveling back to England after the war and his time in the reserves.

Interview by John Carter

Comments

Image ID: 14259

See additional files below for full transcript.

14259_transcript.pdf (189 kB)
Edward Jacobsen oral history interview transcript

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