Date of Award

5-2019

Culminating Project Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Marriage and Family Therapy: M.S.

Department

Community Psychology, Counseling and Family Therapy

College

School of Health and Human Services

First Advisor

Kathryn Mayhew

Second Advisor

Amanda Hemmesch

Third Advisor

Lucas Volini

Fourth Advisor

Michael Mayhew

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Keywords and Subject Headings

Religiosity, Social Connectedness, Depression, Older Adults

Abstract

This study examined the dimensions of religiosity (i.e., intrinsic, extrinsic, and religious identification) and social connectedness to see how each uniquely contributed to the variability of depression (i.e. a main predictor of suicidality) in older adults, 65 and above. Participants and measures came from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) 3, national data set. MIDUS 3 participants were selected based on a random digit dial sampling method of those living in the United States. Methodology used to answer research questions included Pearson correlation, multiple regression, between-subjects Univariate Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), and independent T-test. Data was analyzed using SPSS. Results indicated extrinsic religiosity is significantly more effective than intrinsic religiosity in fostering social connectedness, increased social connectedness is significantly correlated to lower depression symptoms, and there were differences found in effectiveness between genders and age groups in relation to dimensions of religiosity and social connectedness.

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