Date of Award

12-2020

Culminating Project Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Cultural Resources Management Archaeology: M.S.

Department

Anthropology

College

College of Liberal Arts

First Advisor

Rob Mann

Second Advisor

Mark Muñiz

Third Advisor

Karen Smith

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Keywords and Subject Headings

Metal Detecting Methodology Archaeology Historic

Abstract

This thesis focuses on testing metal detector methodology at the eighteenth-century colonial site of Hobcaw North on the coast of South Carolina. In recent decades metal detectors have become an accepted part of the archaeological toolkit, yet their use is generally limited to the role of site discovery and delineation. With the goal of broadening the role of metal detector use, several research questions were designed to test what other methodological approaches can be utilized. These questions build upon the foundation of an intensive, full-coverage metal detector survey previously conducted at Hobcaw North. The first question looks at the utility of screening soil to recover non-metallic artifacts when excavating the targeted metallic object. The next question compares the full-coverage metal detector survey to two versions of a less intensive metal detector survey and a shovel test survey in order to see what differences there are in any revealed artifact patterning between these methods. The final question looks at whether a metal detector survey can reveal information about artifact patterning, how the inclusion of non-metallic artifacts alters interpretations, and if the results can be used to effectively guide test unit placement. The results of this study show that there is room for innovation in metal detecting methodology.

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