Event Title

The Effects of Sodium Bicarbonate on Type I Diabetes in Mice

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

23-4-2019 12:00 AM

End Date

23-4-2019 12:00 AM

Description

Best Undergraduate Poster Presentation.

Abstract

Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease where inflammatory T cells attack insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, leading to increased blood glucose levels. The only current treatment, insulin injections, are expensive, leaving a great need for alternative methods of treating T1D. In a recent study, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) was shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, raising questions about its potential for treating autoimmune diseases. Thus, the effects of NaHCO3 should be evaluated in an experimental mouse model of T1D. It was hypothesized that NaHCO3 treatment would decrease the incidence and severity of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced T1D in C57BL/6J male mice. To test this hypothesis, mice were placed into control and treatment groups. The treatment group received NaHCO3 via their drinking water at a dosage of 200mM at six weeks of age, while the control group drank regular water. Mice were treated by STZ at seven weeks of age to induce experimental T1D. Glucose and body weight measurements were taken biweekly until mice were sacrificed at 12 weeks of age. Mice were considered diabetic after two consecutive glucose readings >250mg/dl. Analysis of the glucose data showed significantly decreased glucose levels and delayed diabetes development in treated mice compared to the controls. These preliminary results support the initial hypothesis, suggesting beneficial effects of sodium bicarbonate in prevention of mouse T1D, and highlighting the need for further study of its effects on autoimmune diseases.

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Apr 23rd, 12:00 AM Apr 23rd, 12:00 AM

The Effects of Sodium Bicarbonate on Type I Diabetes in Mice

Best Undergraduate Poster Presentation.

Abstract

Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease where inflammatory T cells attack insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, leading to increased blood glucose levels. The only current treatment, insulin injections, are expensive, leaving a great need for alternative methods of treating T1D. In a recent study, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) was shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, raising questions about its potential for treating autoimmune diseases. Thus, the effects of NaHCO3 should be evaluated in an experimental mouse model of T1D. It was hypothesized that NaHCO3 treatment would decrease the incidence and severity of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced T1D in C57BL/6J male mice. To test this hypothesis, mice were placed into control and treatment groups. The treatment group received NaHCO3 via their drinking water at a dosage of 200mM at six weeks of age, while the control group drank regular water. Mice were treated by STZ at seven weeks of age to induce experimental T1D. Glucose and body weight measurements were taken biweekly until mice were sacrificed at 12 weeks of age. Mice were considered diabetic after two consecutive glucose readings >250mg/dl. Analysis of the glucose data showed significantly decreased glucose levels and delayed diabetes development in treated mice compared to the controls. These preliminary results support the initial hypothesis, suggesting beneficial effects of sodium bicarbonate in prevention of mouse T1D, and highlighting the need for further study of its effects on autoimmune diseases.